🌾 Cereals

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This product will be released at 15 December 2021
Delivery information
This product will be released at 20 December 2021

Buy organic cereals online

We would all agree that pasta and rice are something nice, right? So versatile, delicious, and easy to prepare! But sometimes we feel the need to have something different, to vary our diet a bit. If you know the feeling only too well, you have come to the right place. Take a look around our Cereals category – but prepare yourself for surprising discoveries and inspiration! The universe of millet, couscous, bulgur & Co is waiting for you.

KoRo’s organic cereals

If you know KoRo a bit, then you must also already know how important the quality of all our products is for us. Most of our cereals come from certified organic agriculture and, when possible, we support local farmers, like with our organic spelt semolina from Germany. At KoRo, one of our goals is to keep the supply chains as short and linear as possible. The organic cereals are therefore packed in our sales packages fresh from the mill; in addition to maximum freshness, this ensures a restraint of the prices which benefit our customers and allow us to ensure fair remunerations for our suppliers.

This is what you can find in our Cereals category:

Cereal does not equal wheat: the most important cereals

There are far more types of grain than you might think when hearing the term. Wheat is still the most widely cultivated cereal in Europe and Germany, but other plants that belong to the sweet grass family have also been century and millennial-long companions to humankind, and staple foods in our kitchens. In addition to wheat, the most important types of cereal for human consumption include rice, maize, millet, rye, oats and barley.

Wheat

When thinking about wheat, the first thing that comes to your mind is probably the inevitable pack of white flour which cannot be missing in any pantry. Nowadays the basis of many people’s diet, the most widely cultivated type of wheat is called common wheat, and is worldwide used for the production of bread, pastries, and baked goods. Moreover, normal pasta, couscous and bulgur are made of wheat. Less known but just as versatile, delicious, and practical is spelt, an ancient species of wheat which has been cultivated for thousands of years and is now having a culinary Renaissance. Gently nutty in taste, spelt is very high in fibre and a true all-rounder; spelt flakes will take your porridge to another level, spelt pasta will pleasantly surprise every pasta lover, and whole-grain spelt is a wonderful addition to any soup and stew.

Rice

For a large part of the world population and especially in Asia, rice is without a doubt the most important food. With its incredible variety of types and its versatility, rice is a staple food of which one cannot ever have enough. The main difference is between long and short grain rice – to the former group belong Basmati and Jasmine rice, and to the latter, pudding, sushi, and risotto rice. Here you can find an overview of all our rice types!

Millet

This small-grain cereal has a long tradition, but it was somewhat forgotten, shaded by the growing popularity of rice, potatoes and corn. Fortunately, in recent years, millet has been making its well-deserved comeback! This gluten-free cereal tastes wonderful in combination with meat, fish, and vegetables, but can also be a great ingredient in sweet recipes - try matching it with cinnamon and sugar! Millet flakes are also a versatile and tasty gluten-free alternative to classic rolled oats. KoRo's millet comes from 100% certified organic cultivation.

Maize

Just like millet, corn is also a gluten-free grain. The only common grain that is native of America, maize has been exported to and cultivated in Europe for centuries. While supermarkets sell corn mostly in its canned version, at KoRo, as with many of our products, we prefer the particularly gentle preservation process of freeze-drying. Freeze-dried corn has its water content removed after the grains have been schock-frozen; albeit it might not sound very gentle, this preservation procedure ensures the preservation of most vitamins and nutrients. Maiz will surprise you not only with its sweet taste, but also with its versatility! Add it to your soups and stews, top you salads with it – you can let your creativity run free. Last but not least, to warm up your body and your soul in the freezing winter months, you can always rely on hot and creamy, delicious polenta.

Oat, rye and barley 

These three types of grain are best known due to their presence on the breakfast table. Oatmeal belongs to every balanced muesli, and oat milk is one of the most popular plant-based alternatives to cow's milk. Like oats, wheat, barley and rye can also be ground and rolled wonderfully, and this is why we have combined them in our versatile 4-grain muesli, which will convince you not only in a porridge bowl, but also as an addition to vegetarian patties. Rye is very popular in Nordic countries like Germany, whose rye bread is a delicious and high-fibre all time favourite that can be found in every bakery. And to place a beautiful-looking cherry on top of this breakfast sundae, what about a green superfood smoothie with barley grass powder? To obtain this more and more popular powder, the leaves of the young barley plant are freeze-dried and then ground.

Pseudocereals

According to the definition, pseudograins are grains that are used in a similar way to cereals, but do not grow on plants from the sweet grass family like wheat, rye and the like. All pseudocereals are gluten-free and therefore a good alternative to real cereals, especially for people with gluten intolerance (celiac disease). Buckwheat, quinoa, and amaranth are some of the most important and beloved pseudograins.

Are couscous, millet, weath, and corn healthy?

Healthy is, above all, a varied and balanced diet full of fresh produce, and an active lifestyle. As cereals are so many, incorporating different ones into your diet can be a great way to diversify your meals. Moreover, as their nutritional values can also be rather different from one another, they add different vitamins and minerals, and nutrients to your meals. Consumed in their whole-grain versions, cereals are very high-fiber, and will invite you to experiment with combinations and proportions! Try replacing pasta with polenta, for example, or rice with couscous, and it’s not going to be long before a whole new world of taste unfolds before you.

How to use cereals in the kitchen

Perfect with the cold and warm weather alike, cereals are definitely a wonderful all-rounder in the kitchen. Even beyond rice or pasta, cooking cereal products is usually straightforward and uncomplicated. A refreshing couscous salad can be prepared in just a few minutes, and with no need for a recipe! Just follow your taste, and simply use your couscous as a base for all your favourite veggies, legumes, nuts, and even fruits; and it is also a great way to use up leftovers – everything that tastes good is allowed in the couscous salad, which is usually served cold. Typical of North African cuisine, couscous is super easy to prepare; just follow the instructions printed on the packaging, and then let your creativity run free!

The same goes for bulgur, whose preparation is similar to that of couscous, and can be used just like you would use rice. As bulgur is steamed, during its production process, it is ready to eat already after a few minutes of soaking in hot water, just like couscous. In the Turkish cuisine, bulgur is the main ingredient of the traditional Pilav. Its looks remind us of millet, which, contrary to bulgur, is not a product of durum wheat. 

Although millet has always been a widespread staple food in Europe since the Middle Ages, in more recent times this tiny grain was almost forgotten. Fortunately, its popularity is growing again, and rightly so! Millet is an ideal gluten-free side for vegetables, fish, or meat. In addition to millet porridge and millet salad, this cereal can also be used to bake delicious pita bread. When it comes to side dishes that have been wrongly forgotten, we must mention another one: polenta, who is often discredited for being dry and bland. However, as the Italians know, prepared properly and matched with the right herbs and spices, polenta turns into a delicious and wonderfully creamy dish.

Recipes with bulgur, couscous, millet & Co

Whether gluten-free, low-sugar and low-carb, vegan, or plant-based, recipes with cereals and grains are many and mostly easy and delicious. Take a look at our Food journal page, where we collect all the tried and tested recipes we have fallen in love with. For a cold winter morning, we highly recommend a sweet take on millet, using it as the base for a sweet porridge topped with berries and pumpkin seed butter; doesn’t it sound just heavenly? Adding cereals to your morning porridge or muesli bowls is a very nice way to vary your breakfast routine and incorporate more fibre in your diet. 

And for lunch? Well, few things are better than a fresh, colourful and crunchy couscous salad, on a hot summer day. Here you can really improvise and follow your creativity, as couscous goes very well with most vegetables and legumes; the trick to a perfect couscous salad is to add some crunchiness (seeds and chopped up nuts will also bring healthy fats and protein), and sprinkle some lime juice on it. 

If you want to serve your guests a more refined dish, you should give this couscous pan with veggies and chicken a try; the coconut milk adds an exotic touch to it and makes your dish super creamy! Last but not least, the versatile couscous can be employed in original desserts as well; luckily, at KoRo you find couscous in convenient large-sized bags! And remember that in your couscous-based recipes, you can always replace it with bulgur simply in a 1:1 proportion. Ideal for making vegan burgers and patties, bulgur should be combined with lentils and breadcrumbs or oats, a few herbs and spices – and voilà!, your veggie burgers are ready to be cooked and enjoyed. 

If you are looking for a delicious and easy snack for your next party, we would try making polenta according to the instructions, and, once cooled down, frying it in large and thick slices or squares which can be then topped with fresh tomato sauce, cheese, or mushrooms. Yum! Have fun with your cereals, and share your creations with us!

All questions about our cereals

We want you to have all the information you might need concerning our cereals. If you have a specific question regarding one of our products, take a look at its page and Specifications document. Should you not be able to find anywhere what you are looking for, do not hesitate to contact us per email or on our social media pages; we are always happy to help!

Couscous, bulgur, quinoa & Co – what’s the difference?

Is your partner mad at you for having mistaken couscous for quinoa? If you cannot make sense of the world anymore, we are here to help you out: yes, these cereals do indeed look very much alike, but they are actually different things. 

Both made from milled wheat, couscous and bulgur are very similar in looks, taste, and preparation. They are both a great side to vegetables and currys, and contain gluten. Millet, on the other hand, is the unprocessed seed of the millet plant, which is naturally gluten-free. Also gluten-free but no cereal, quinoa does not belong to the cereal grasses family but is a so-called pseudocereal instead. As with millet, the grain of the plant is used directly for quinoa too. It is important that the quinoa grains should first be rinsed thoroughly under running water before use.

Can I buy organic cereals at KoRo?

Yes, most of our cereals, like our organic millet, couscous, and bulgur, comes from 100 % certified organic agriculture.

Are cereals good to lose weight?

The most important thing to keep in mind when trying to lose weight, is to eat in a calorie deficit. In order to do this successfully, limiting your refined carbohydrate intake can be helpful. In their stead, you should consume complex and unrefined carbs, which your body needs longer to break down and have you therefore feeling full for a longer time. Complex carbs are potatoes, nuts, legumes, and unrefined cereals and pseudocereals like oats, spelt, quinoa, buckwheat, and millet. When buying them, you should try to prioritise their whole-grain version, as it is even more high-fibre; fibre is not absorbed by our body and is therefore practically calorie-free – but is a crucial part of a healthy nutrition, as they feed our gut bacteria. Our couscous, for example, is 100 % whole-grain.

Are cereals vegan?

Yes, they all are. Moreover, whole-grain products like our couscous are rich in important nutrients, minerals, vitamins, and fibre. This is why cereals should be a basic component of our diet.

Are some cereals gluten-free?

Yes! While couscous and bulgur do contain gluten, as they are by products of wheat, millet, rice, and corn are naturally gluten-free. However, due to possible cross-contaminations which can take place during the packaging process, we cannot call them gluten-free. In our pseudocereal category, you can find other products which are naturally gluten-free and legally so defined, like quinoa and buckwheat.

Buy organic cereals online We would all agree that pasta and rice are something nice, right? So versatile, delicious, and easy to prepare! But sometimes we feel the need to have something... read more »
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Cereals

Buy organic cereals online

We would all agree that pasta and rice are something nice, right? So versatile, delicious, and easy to prepare! But sometimes we feel the need to have something different, to vary our diet a bit. If you know the feeling only too well, you have come to the right place. Take a look around our Cereals category – but prepare yourself for surprising discoveries and inspiration! The universe of millet, couscous, bulgur & Co is waiting for you.

KoRo’s organic cereals

If you know KoRo a bit, then you must also already know how important the quality of all our products is for us. Most of our cereals come from certified organic agriculture and, when possible, we support local farmers, like with our organic spelt semolina from Germany. At KoRo, one of our goals is to keep the supply chains as short and linear as possible. The organic cereals are therefore packed in our sales packages fresh from the mill; in addition to maximum freshness, this ensures a restraint of the prices which benefit our customers and allow us to ensure fair remunerations for our suppliers.

This is what you can find in our Cereals category:

Cereal does not equal wheat: the most important cereals

There are far more types of grain than you might think when hearing the term. Wheat is still the most widely cultivated cereal in Europe and Germany, but other plants that belong to the sweet grass family have also been century and millennial-long companions to humankind, and staple foods in our kitchens. In addition to wheat, the most important types of cereal for human consumption include rice, maize, millet, rye, oats and barley.

Wheat

When thinking about wheat, the first thing that comes to your mind is probably the inevitable pack of white flour which cannot be missing in any pantry. Nowadays the basis of many people’s diet, the most widely cultivated type of wheat is called common wheat, and is worldwide used for the production of bread, pastries, and baked goods. Moreover, normal pasta, couscous and bulgur are made of wheat. Less known but just as versatile, delicious, and practical is spelt, an ancient species of wheat which has been cultivated for thousands of years and is now having a culinary Renaissance. Gently nutty in taste, spelt is very high in fibre and a true all-rounder; spelt flakes will take your porridge to another level, spelt pasta will pleasantly surprise every pasta lover, and whole-grain spelt is a wonderful addition to any soup and stew.

Rice

For a large part of the world population and especially in Asia, rice is without a doubt the most important food. With its incredible variety of types and its versatility, rice is a staple food of which one cannot ever have enough. The main difference is between long and short grain rice – to the former group belong Basmati and Jasmine rice, and to the latter, pudding, sushi, and risotto rice. Here you can find an overview of all our rice types!

Millet

This small-grain cereal has a long tradition, but it was somewhat forgotten, shaded by the growing popularity of rice, potatoes and corn. Fortunately, in recent years, millet has been making its well-deserved comeback! This gluten-free cereal tastes wonderful in combination with meat, fish, and vegetables, but can also be a great ingredient in sweet recipes - try matching it with cinnamon and sugar! Millet flakes are also a versatile and tasty gluten-free alternative to classic rolled oats. KoRo's millet comes from 100% certified organic cultivation.

Maize

Just like millet, corn is also a gluten-free grain. The only common grain that is native of America, maize has been exported to and cultivated in Europe for centuries. While supermarkets sell corn mostly in its canned version, at KoRo, as with many of our products, we prefer the particularly gentle preservation process of freeze-drying. Freeze-dried corn has its water content removed after the grains have been schock-frozen; albeit it might not sound very gentle, this preservation procedure ensures the preservation of most vitamins and nutrients. Maiz will surprise you not only with its sweet taste, but also with its versatility! Add it to your soups and stews, top you salads with it – you can let your creativity run free. Last but not least, to warm up your body and your soul in the freezing winter months, you can always rely on hot and creamy, delicious polenta.

Oat, rye and barley 

These three types of grain are best known due to their presence on the breakfast table. Oatmeal belongs to every balanced muesli, and oat milk is one of the most popular plant-based alternatives to cow's milk. Like oats, wheat, barley and rye can also be ground and rolled wonderfully, and this is why we have combined them in our versatile 4-grain muesli, which will convince you not only in a porridge bowl, but also as an addition to vegetarian patties. Rye is very popular in Nordic countries like Germany, whose rye bread is a delicious and high-fibre all time favourite that can be found in every bakery. And to place a beautiful-looking cherry on top of this breakfast sundae, what about a green superfood smoothie with barley grass powder? To obtain this more and more popular powder, the leaves of the young barley plant are freeze-dried and then ground.

Pseudocereals

According to the definition, pseudograins are grains that are used in a similar way to cereals, but do not grow on plants from the sweet grass family like wheat, rye and the like. All pseudocereals are gluten-free and therefore a good alternative to real cereals, especially for people with gluten intolerance (celiac disease). Buckwheat, quinoa, and amaranth are some of the most important and beloved pseudograins.

Are couscous, millet, weath, and corn healthy?

Healthy is, above all, a varied and balanced diet full of fresh produce, and an active lifestyle. As cereals are so many, incorporating different ones into your diet can be a great way to diversify your meals. Moreover, as their nutritional values can also be rather different from one another, they add different vitamins and minerals, and nutrients to your meals. Consumed in their whole-grain versions, cereals are very high-fiber, and will invite you to experiment with combinations and proportions! Try replacing pasta with polenta, for example, or rice with couscous, and it’s not going to be long before a whole new world of taste unfolds before you.

How to use cereals in the kitchen

Perfect with the cold and warm weather alike, cereals are definitely a wonderful all-rounder in the kitchen. Even beyond rice or pasta, cooking cereal products is usually straightforward and uncomplicated. A refreshing couscous salad can be prepared in just a few minutes, and with no need for a recipe! Just follow your taste, and simply use your couscous as a base for all your favourite veggies, legumes, nuts, and even fruits; and it is also a great way to use up leftovers – everything that tastes good is allowed in the couscous salad, which is usually served cold. Typical of North African cuisine, couscous is super easy to prepare; just follow the instructions printed on the packaging, and then let your creativity run free!

The same goes for bulgur, whose preparation is similar to that of couscous, and can be used just like you would use rice. As bulgur is steamed, during its production process, it is ready to eat already after a few minutes of soaking in hot water, just like couscous. In the Turkish cuisine, bulgur is the main ingredient of the traditional Pilav. Its looks remind us of millet, which, contrary to bulgur, is not a product of durum wheat. 

Although millet has always been a widespread staple food in Europe since the Middle Ages, in more recent times this tiny grain was almost forgotten. Fortunately, its popularity is growing again, and rightly so! Millet is an ideal gluten-free side for vegetables, fish, or meat. In addition to millet porridge and millet salad, this cereal can also be used to bake delicious pita bread. When it comes to side dishes that have been wrongly forgotten, we must mention another one: polenta, who is often discredited for being dry and bland. However, as the Italians know, prepared properly and matched with the right herbs and spices, polenta turns into a delicious and wonderfully creamy dish.

Recipes with bulgur, couscous, millet & Co

Whether gluten-free, low-sugar and low-carb, vegan, or plant-based, recipes with cereals and grains are many and mostly easy and delicious. Take a look at our Food journal page, where we collect all the tried and tested recipes we have fallen in love with. For a cold winter morning, we highly recommend a sweet take on millet, using it as the base for a sweet porridge topped with berries and pumpkin seed butter; doesn’t it sound just heavenly? Adding cereals to your morning porridge or muesli bowls is a very nice way to vary your breakfast routine and incorporate more fibre in your diet. 

And for lunch? Well, few things are better than a fresh, colourful and crunchy couscous salad, on a hot summer day. Here you can really improvise and follow your creativity, as couscous goes very well with most vegetables and legumes; the trick to a perfect couscous salad is to add some crunchiness (seeds and chopped up nuts will also bring healthy fats and protein), and sprinkle some lime juice on it. 

If you want to serve your guests a more refined dish, you should give this couscous pan with veggies and chicken a try; the coconut milk adds an exotic touch to it and makes your dish super creamy! Last but not least, the versatile couscous can be employed in original desserts as well; luckily, at KoRo you find couscous in convenient large-sized bags! And remember that in your couscous-based recipes, you can always replace it with bulgur simply in a 1:1 proportion. Ideal for making vegan burgers and patties, bulgur should be combined with lentils and breadcrumbs or oats, a few herbs and spices – and voilà!, your veggie burgers are ready to be cooked and enjoyed. 

If you are looking for a delicious and easy snack for your next party, we would try making polenta according to the instructions, and, once cooled down, frying it in large and thick slices or squares which can be then topped with fresh tomato sauce, cheese, or mushrooms. Yum! Have fun with your cereals, and share your creations with us!

All questions about our cereals

We want you to have all the information you might need concerning our cereals. If you have a specific question regarding one of our products, take a look at its page and Specifications document. Should you not be able to find anywhere what you are looking for, do not hesitate to contact us per email or on our social media pages; we are always happy to help!

Couscous, bulgur, quinoa & Co – what’s the difference?

Is your partner mad at you for having mistaken couscous for quinoa? If you cannot make sense of the world anymore, we are here to help you out: yes, these cereals do indeed look very much alike, but they are actually different things. 

Both made from milled wheat, couscous and bulgur are very similar in looks, taste, and preparation. They are both a great side to vegetables and currys, and contain gluten. Millet, on the other hand, is the unprocessed seed of the millet plant, which is naturally gluten-free. Also gluten-free but no cereal, quinoa does not belong to the cereal grasses family but is a so-called pseudocereal instead. As with millet, the grain of the plant is used directly for quinoa too. It is important that the quinoa grains should first be rinsed thoroughly under running water before use.

Can I buy organic cereals at KoRo?

Yes, most of our cereals, like our organic millet, couscous, and bulgur, comes from 100 % certified organic agriculture.

Are cereals good to lose weight?

The most important thing to keep in mind when trying to lose weight, is to eat in a calorie deficit. In order to do this successfully, limiting your refined carbohydrate intake can be helpful. In their stead, you should consume complex and unrefined carbs, which your body needs longer to break down and have you therefore feeling full for a longer time. Complex carbs are potatoes, nuts, legumes, and unrefined cereals and pseudocereals like oats, spelt, quinoa, buckwheat, and millet. When buying them, you should try to prioritise their whole-grain version, as it is even more high-fibre; fibre is not absorbed by our body and is therefore practically calorie-free – but is a crucial part of a healthy nutrition, as they feed our gut bacteria. Our couscous, for example, is 100 % whole-grain.

Are cereals vegan?

Yes, they all are. Moreover, whole-grain products like our couscous are rich in important nutrients, minerals, vitamins, and fibre. This is why cereals should be a basic component of our diet.

Are some cereals gluten-free?

Yes! While couscous and bulgur do contain gluten, as they are by products of wheat, millet, rice, and corn are naturally gluten-free. However, due to possible cross-contaminations which can take place during the packaging process, we cannot call them gluten-free. In our pseudocereal category, you can find other products which are naturally gluten-free and legally so defined, like quinoa and buckwheat.